Changes – Joining Office of CTO

Almost 2 years ago I joined Integration Engineering (R&D) within VMware. As part of that role within Integration Engineering I was very fortunate to work on a very exciting project called “MARVIN”, as most of you know MARVIN became EVO:RAIL, which is what was my primary focus for the last 18 months or so. EVO:RAIL evolved in to a team after a successful prototype and came “out of stealth” at VMworld when it is was announced by Pat Gelsinger. Very exciting project, great opportunity and an experience I would not have wanted to miss out on. Truly unique to be one of the three founding members and see it grow from a couple of sketches and ideas to a solution. I want to thank Mornay for providing me the opportunity to be part of the MARVIN rollercoaster ride, and the EVO:RAIL team for the ride / experience / discussions etc!

Over the last months I have been thinking about where I wanted to go next and today I am humbled and proud to announce that I am joining VMware’s Office of CTO (OCTO as they refer to it within VMware) as a Chief Technologist. I’ve been with VMware little over 6 years, and started out as a Senior Consultant within PSO… I never imagined, not even in my wildest dreams, that one day I would have the opportunity to join a team like this. Very honoured, and looking forward to what is ahead. I am sure I will be placed in many uncomfortable situations, but I know from experience that that is needed in order to grow. I don’t expect much to change on my blog, I will keep writing about products / features / vendors / solutions I am passionate about. That definitely was Virtual SAN in 2014, and could be Virtual Volumes or NSX in 2015… who knows!

Go OCTO!

It is all about choice

The last couple of years we’ve seen a major shift in the market towards the software-defined datacenter. This has resulted in many new products, features and solutions being brought to market. What struck me though over the last couple of days is that many of the articles I have read in the past 6 months (and written as well) were about hardware and in many cases about the form factor or how it has changed. Also, there are the posts around hyper-converged vs traditional, or all flash storage solutions vs server side caching. Although we are moving towards a software-defined world, it seems that administrators / consultants / architects still very much live in the physical world. In many of these cases it even seems like there is a certain prejudice when it comes to the various types of products and the form factor they come in and whether that is 2U vs blade or software vs hardware is beside the point.

When I look at discussions being held around whether server side caching solutions is preferred over an all-flash arrays, which is just another form factor discussion if you ask me, the only right answer that comes to mind is “it depends”. It depends on what your business requirements are, what your budget is, if there are any constraints from an environmental perspective, hardware life cycle, what your staff’s expertise / knowledge is etc etc. It is impossible to to provide a single answer and solution to all the problems out there. What I realized is that what the software-defined movement actually brought us is choice, and in many of these cases the form factor is just a tiny aspect of the total story. It seems to be important though for many people, maybe still an inheritance from the “server hugger” days where hardware was still king? Those times are long gone though if you ask me.

In some cases a server side caching solutions will be the perfect fit, for instance when ultra low latency and use of existing storage infrastructure  is a requirement. In other cases bringing in an all-flash array may make more sense, or a hyper-converged appliance could be the perfect fit for that particular use case. What is more important though is how these components will enable you to optimize your operations, how these components will enable you to build that software-defined datacenter and help you meet the demands of the business. This is what you will need to ask yourself when looking at these various solutions, and if there is no clear answer… there is plenty of choice out there, stay open minded and go explore.

VMware EVO:RAIL demos

I just bumped in to a bunch of new VMware EVO:RAIL demos which I wanted to share. Especially the third demo which shows how EVO:RAIL scales out by a couple of simple clicks.

General overview:

Customer Testimonial:


Clustering appliances:

Management experience:

Configuration experience:

x

Queue Depth info in the VSAN HCL!

I just noticed there has been an update to the VSAN HCL. When I now do a search for a disk controller (vmwa.re/vsanhcl) it immediately shows the queue depth of the controller. This will make life a lot easier, especially for those who prefer to build their own Virtual SAN node instead of using a Ready Node configuration. Although it is just a minor detail it is useful to know, and will definitely make life a lot easier when configuring your component built Virtual SAN nodes.

EVO:RAIL engineering interview with Dave Shanley (Lead Dev)

A couple of weeks ago we launched EVO:RAIL, a new VMware solution. I have been part of this since the very beginning, the prototype project started with just Dave and myself as part of the prototype team with Mornay van der Walt as the executive sponsor (interview with Mornay will follow shortly as this project involves many different disciplines). After Dave developed the initial UI mock-ups and we worked on the conceptual architecture, Dave started developing what then became known internally as MARVIN. If my memory serves correct it was our director at Integration Engineering (Adam Z.) who came up with the name and acronym (Modular Automated Rackable Virtual Infrastructure Node). All was done under the umbrella of Integration Engineering, in stealth mode with a very small team. I guess something not a lot of people know is that for instance William Lam was very instrumental when it came to figuring out in which order to configure what (a lot of dependencies as you can imagine) and which API calls to use for what. After a couple of months things really started to shape up, the prototype was demoed to C level and before we realized a new team was formed and gears shifted.

Personally whenever I talk to start-ups I like to know where they came from, what they’ve done in the past, how things went about… as that gives me a better understanding of why the product is what it is. Same applies to EVO:RAIL, no better start then with the lead developer and founding team member Dave Shanley

Good morning Dave, as not all of my readers will know who you are and what you did before joining the EVO:RAIL team can you please introduce yourself.
I’m the lead engineer, designer and software architect of the EVO:RAIL platform. I joined VMware about two and a half years ago. I started out in Integration Engineering, I got to see and experience a lot of the frustration that is often seen when trying to install, configure and integrate our technology. I’ve pretty much worked in web application engineering my entire career that has given me a really broad experience across consumer and enterprise technology. Before VMware I was the CTO of a really cool VC funded start-up in the UK as well as being the lead engineer over at McCann Erickson’s EMEA HQ. [Read more...]