RE: The VCDX candidates advantage over the panellists

I was reading Josh Odger’s post on the VCDX Defense. Josh’s article can be summarised with the following part:

As a result, the candidate should be an expert in the design being presented and answering questions from the panel about the design should not be intimidating.

Having gone through the process myself, knowing many of the VCDX’s and having been on countless of panels I completely disagree with Josh. Sure, you do need to know your design inside/out… but, it is not about “who’s having an advantage”, the panel member is not there to fail or pass the candidate… they are there to assess your skills as an architect!

If you look at the defense day there are three parts:

  1. Defend your design
  2. Design scenario
  3. Troubleshooting scenario

For the design and troubleshooting scenario you get a random exercise, so you have no prior knowledge of what will be asked. When it comes to defending your design of course you will know your design (hopefully) better then anyone else. However, the questions you get will not necessarily be about the specifics or details of your design. The VCDX panel is there to assess your skills as an architect and not your “fact cramming skills”. A good panel will ask a lot of hypothetical questions like:

  • Your design uses NFS based storage, how would FC connected storage have changed your design?
  • Your design is based on capacity requirements for 80 virtual machine, what would  you have done differently when the requirement would be 8000 virtual machines?
  • Your design …

So when you do mock exams, prepare for these types of hypothetical questions. That is when you really start to understand the impact decisions can have, and when during your defense you get one of these questions and you do not know the answer make sure you guide the panel through your thought process. That is what differentiates someone who can learn facts (VCP exam) and someone who can digest them, understand them and apply them in different scenarios (VCDX exam).

As I stated, it may sound like that you knowing your design inside out means having a big advantage over the panel members but it probably isn’t… that is not what they are testing you on! Your ability to assess and adapt are put through the wringer, your skills as an architect are tested thoroughly and that is where you will need to do well.

Good luck!

VMware patches for #shellshock

Last night a whole bunch of patches for the shellshock security issue were released. Although I am hoping that all of you have your datacenter secured for outside threads and inside threads by isolating networks, firewalls etc… It would be wise to install these patches ASAP. Majority of linux based VMware appliances were impacted, but luckily patching them is not a huge thing. Below you can find a list of the patches and links to the downloads for your convenience.

Note that the downloads are in the middle of the list, so you need to scroll down before you see them. There are also patches for products like the VMware VSA, vSphere Replication, VC Ops etc. Make sure to download those as well!

Changes – Joining Office of CTO

Almost 2 years ago I joined Integration Engineering (R&D) within VMware. As part of that role within Integration Engineering I was very fortunate to work on a very exciting project called “MARVIN”, as most of you know MARVIN became EVO:RAIL, which is what was my primary focus for the last 18 months or so. EVO:RAIL evolved in to a team after a successful prototype and came “out of stealth” at VMworld when it is was announced by Pat Gelsinger. Very exciting project, great opportunity and an experience I would not have wanted to miss out on. Truly unique to be one of the three founding members and see it grow from a couple of sketches and ideas to a solution. I want to thank Mornay for providing me the opportunity to be part of the MARVIN rollercoaster ride, and the EVO:RAIL team for the ride / experience / discussions etc!

Over the last months I have been thinking about where I wanted to go next and today I am humbled and proud to announce that I am joining VMware’s Office of CTO (OCTO as they refer to it within VMware) as a Chief Technologist. I’ve been with VMware little over 6 years, and started out as a Senior Consultant within PSO… I never imagined, not even in my wildest dreams, that one day I would have the opportunity to join a team like this. Very honoured, and looking forward to what is ahead. I am sure I will be placed in many uncomfortable situations, but I know from experience that that is needed in order to grow. I don’t expect much to change on my blog, I will keep writing about products / features / vendors / solutions I am passionate about. That definitely was Virtual SAN in 2014, and could be Virtual Volumes or NSX in 2015… who knows!

Go OCTO!

It is all about choice

The last couple of years we’ve seen a major shift in the market towards the software-defined datacenter. This has resulted in many new products, features and solutions being brought to market. What struck me though over the last couple of days is that many of the articles I have read in the past 6 months (and written as well) were about hardware and in many cases about the form factor or how it has changed. Also, there are the posts around hyper-converged vs traditional, or all flash storage solutions vs server side caching. Although we are moving towards a software-defined world, it seems that administrators / consultants / architects still very much live in the physical world. In many of these cases it even seems like there is a certain prejudice when it comes to the various types of products and the form factor they come in and whether that is 2U vs blade or software vs hardware is beside the point.

When I look at discussions being held around whether server side caching solutions is preferred over an all-flash arrays, which is just another form factor discussion if you ask me, the only right answer that comes to mind is “it depends”. It depends on what your business requirements are, what your budget is, if there are any constraints from an environmental perspective, hardware life cycle, what your staff’s expertise / knowledge is etc etc. It is impossible to to provide a single answer and solution to all the problems out there. What I realized is that what the software-defined movement actually brought us is choice, and in many of these cases the form factor is just a tiny aspect of the total story. It seems to be important though for many people, maybe still an inheritance from the “server hugger” days where hardware was still king? Those times are long gone though if you ask me.

In some cases a server side caching solutions will be the perfect fit, for instance when ultra low latency and use of existing storage infrastructure  is a requirement. In other cases bringing in an all-flash array may make more sense, or a hyper-converged appliance could be the perfect fit for that particular use case. What is more important though is how these components will enable you to optimize your operations, how these components will enable you to build that software-defined datacenter and help you meet the demands of the business. This is what you will need to ask yourself when looking at these various solutions, and if there is no clear answer… there is plenty of choice out there, stay open minded and go explore.

VMware EVO:RAIL demos

I just bumped in to a bunch of new VMware EVO:RAIL demos which I wanted to share. Especially the third demo which shows how EVO:RAIL scales out by a couple of simple clicks.

General overview:

Customer Testimonial:


Clustering appliances:

Management experience:

Configuration experience:

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